Suicide Prevention Month Information and Mental Health Resources

Friday, Sep 18, 2020

Suicide PreventionButte Strong

If Butte County can be called anything, it is resilient. Our community has been through fire, near dam breaks, and more fire, each of which creates stress and anxiety in many, but we still take care of each other and look to the future in hope.

September is Suicide Awareness Month and in the spirit of service and support, we want to provide you with facts and resources. While the grit, determination and even humor needed to get through tough times is something to be admired, it should never translate to shame for those who need help.

If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or call 911 immediately.

To help fire survivors and fire fighters [Click Here]

Suicide Statistics in the USA

COVID-19 has created an uptick in anxiety and our current social environment is making triggers more powerful. The feelings of hopelessness with little to no relief can lead to thoughts of suicide. According to the CDC, suicide is a classified public health problem because of its far-reaching effects:

  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. It was responsible for more than 48,000 deaths in 2018.
  • In 2018, 10.7 million American adults seriously thought about suicide, 3.3 million made a plan, and 1.4 million attempted suicide.
  • People who have experienced violence, including child abuse, bullying, or sexual violence are at higher risk for suicide.

What to Watch For

Individual, relationship, community, and societal factors may influence the risk of suicide. Know the suicide warning signs including:

  • Feeling like a burden
  • Being isolated
  • Increased anxiety
  • Feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Increased substance use
  • Looking for a way to access lethal means
  • Increased anger or rage
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Expressing hopelessness
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Talking or posting about wanting to die
  • Making plans for suicide

Self-Care

We are all living in the midst of a pandemic and are affected by it. However, there are still misconceptions and stigmas about self-care and going to see a mental health professional. You may think of "self-care" as a buzzword that only applies to part of the population, but it's very simple and important to incorporate into your life. Doing something as simple as limiting your time on social media is more than good for you, it's a way to protect your mental health. 

Butte 2-1-1 has multiple mental health resources listed on their website [Click Here]

There can be a connotation of selfishness and luxury to practicing self-care, but it's not all bubble baths. If you regularly do any of the following, you may already be an expert in self-care without knowing it. 

  • Saying no when appropriate
  • Saying yes when appropriate
  • Handling conflicts directly and honestly
  • Listening to yourself
  • Taking a break when necessary
  • Living a life based on values
  • Showing up with presence and courage
  • Setting healthy boundaries
  • Practicing compassion
  • Actively engaging in your life

Suicide affects all ages, countries, and income levels and unfortunately deaths by suicide are increasing year to year. We as a community should do our best to educate and support one another and break stigmas about getting help for your mental health. Taking care of your mental health and emotions is just as important as taking care of your body physically. 

So let's keep being strong in Butte County with the understanding and awareness to help those of us who need some extra support. If you or someone you know is having trouble getting food, looking to break the cycle of addiction or needs some help paying their power bill, we may be able to help with that. Contact our offices or check out our website for more information. 

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